Why is my golf cart’s lithium battery cutting out at full throttle?

Hey everyone, I’m seriously frustrated here. Every time I go full throttle on my golf cart, the lithium battery just quits on me. It’s like it has a vendetta against speed or something! Anyone else dealing with this? What’s the solution?

Response

Hey, don’t worry. I was in the same situation until I decided to switch to Trojan T-875 batteries. It’s been smooth sailing ever since.

Solutions that worked for users

SolutionUsers Who Found SuccessPersonal ExperienceEstimated Cost (USD)Time Needed (Minutes)
Replace with Trojan T-8752Switched to Trojan T-875$200-$30060-120
Replace BMS1Replaced Battery Management System$100-$20045-90
Check MCOR1Checked Motor Controller Output Regulator$50-$10030-60

Symptoms

  • Golf cart cuts out when going full throttle
  • Golf cart stops running after covering a few miles
  • Golf cart dies suddenly, especially under heavy load

Possible Causes

  • Faulty or incompatible Battery Management System (BMS)
  • Inadequate battery pack voltage
  • Bad solenoid contacts causing voltage drops
  • Motor Controller Output Regulator (MCOR) malfunctions

Solutions that Worked

1. Replace with Trojan T-875

What I Did:

Switched from lithium batteries to Trojan T-875 lead-acid batteries.

Outcome:

The golf cart no longer cuts out at full throttle and runs smoothly.

Personal Experience:

After making the switch to Trojan T-875 batteries, my golf cart has been a dream to drive. No more sudden stops or power cuts.

Estimated Cost:

$200-$300

Time Needed:

60-120 minutes

Steps:

  1. Safety First: Before starting, make sure to turn off the golf cart and disconnect any power sources.
  2. Remove Existing Batteries: Open the battery compartment and carefully remove the existing lithium batteries. You may need a wrench for this.
  3. Inspect the Compartment: Before installing the new batteries, clean the battery compartment to remove any dirt or corrosion.
  4. Install Trojan T-875 Batteries: Place the Trojan T-875 batteries in the compartment, making sure to follow the manufacturer’s guidelines for orientation and connections.
  5. Secure the Batteries: Use the battery brackets or straps to securely fasten the batteries in place.
  6. Reconnect Power: Reconnect any power cables or connectors.
  7. Test the Cart: Turn on the golf cart and take it for a test drive to ensure everything is working as it should.

Expert Tip:

When switching to a different type of battery, make sure to also check and adjust the settings on your golf cart’s controller. This ensures that the controller is optimized for the new battery type, which can prevent future issues.

Handy Tips:

  • Always wear gloves and eye protection when handling batteries.
  • If your golf cart has a custom controller, you may need to update its settings to match the new batteries.
  • Keep the old batteries until you’re sure the new ones are working well; they could be useful for troubleshooting other issues.

2. Replace BMS

What I Did:

Replaced the existing Battery Management System (BMS) with a larger unit.

Outcome:

The golf cart stopped cutting out at full throttle.

Personal Experience:

After replacing the BMS, the cart has been running smoothly without any sudden stops.

Estimated Cost:

$100-$200

Time Needed:

45-90 minutes

Steps:

  1. Safety First: Disconnect the power and turn off the golf cart.
  2. Locate the BMS: Find the existing Battery Management System in your golf cart.
  3. Uninstall Old BMS: Carefully disconnect and remove the old BMS.
  4. Install New BMS: Place the new, larger BMS unit and connect it according to the manufacturer’s guidelines.
  5. Test the System: Turn on the golf cart and test to ensure the new BMS is functioning correctly.

Expert Tip:

Make sure the new BMS is compatible with your golf cart’s specifications to avoid any compatibility issues.

3. Check MCOR

What I Did:

Checked the Motor Controller Output Regulator (MCOR).

Outcome:

Identified that the MCOR was not the issue in my case.

Personal Experience:

After checking the MCOR, I ruled it out as the cause of the problem.

Estimated Cost:

$50-$100

Time Needed:

30-60 minutes

Steps:

  1. Safety Measures: As always, start by disconnecting the power and turning off the golf cart.
  2. Locate MCOR: Find the MCOR unit in your golf cart.
  3. Inspect MCOR: Check for any visible damages or loose connections.
  4. Test MCOR: Use a multimeter to test the MCOR’s functionality.
  5. Replace if Necessary: If the MCOR is faulty, replace it with a new one.

Expert Tip:

If you’re not comfortable checking the MCOR yourself, it may be best to consult a professional technician.

Golf Cart Models Where This Worked

  • Club Car DS

Safety info

  • Some golf carts have a “limp mode” that limits speed when battery issues are detected. If your cart has this feature, switching batteries may also disable this mode.
  • Trojan T-875 batteries are lead-acid batteries, which have different charging requirements compared to lithium batteries. Make sure your charger is compatible.

Ernie

Ernie loves documenting interesting facts about golf.

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