How to Test and Replace EZGO Inductive Throttle Sensor

 

Testing EZGO ITS

How to Test EZGO inductive throttle sensor

You can test your EZGO inductive throttle sensor by checking the following:

  • Throttle voltage using Alltrax controllers.
  • Connection with the 4-wire Molex plug.
  • Proximity detector.

 

Throttle voltage using Alltrax controllers

This involves measuring the throttle inputs voltage at the ITS throttle and the controller and ensuring that they are the same. For Series and DCS carts, the signal range should be between 0.4 to 0.6 volts and 1.5 to 1.7 volts.

For PDS carts, the voltage must be between 1.0 +/-0.3 volts and 2.7 +/-0.5 volts.

Remember to jack up the cart and take care not to short between pins when taking the measurements, as the controller may get damaged.

The method of taking measurement differs depending on the type of controller.

 

Alltrax NCX and DCX controllers

  • Pull the 6-pin or 10-pin connector backward so that the pins are exposed just enough to measure them.
  • Keep the key and Run/Tow switch in ON position.
  • Ensure that the F/R switch is in the forward position.
  • Take the voltage reading between both the throttle pins. This should ideally be 10 volts. Press the acceleration pedal fully to the floor at full throttle and take the voltage reading again. It must be 6 volts. 

 

Alltrax NPX, AXE, SPB and SPM controllers

Keep the key on and release the accelerator pedal in such a way that it’s activated at the footswitch. You should hear the closing of the solenoid and see it get lit up with an LED light. Take the voltage reading between both the throttle pins. This must typically be 10 volts. When the pedal is pressed fully at full throttle, the reading must be 6 volts.

If the voltage reading is 12 volts, it’s an indication of a bad ITS unit. A voltage reading of 14 volts indicates the presence of a broken wire connected to the throttle.

 

Connection with the 4-wire Molex plug

The 4-wire Molex plug connecting the wire harness and the throttle box cable is more exposed than the other similar type connectors. This makes it prone to corrosion and leads to intermittent problems. Two of the four wires are for the ITS and the other two are for the throttle microswitch.

If there is no solenoid activation, one or both wires connected to the microswitch fail to make proper contact with the Molex connector.

However, if the solenoid does click but doesn’t go, one or both the other wires connected to the ITS may have failed to make proper contact with the Molex connector.

You can test this by unplugging and plugging the connector repeatedly a few times. You may require a spray contact cleaner to clean the contacts. The Molex connector can be eliminated by soldering its wires and heat-shrinking them. The other option is to use marine-grade butt splices or filling the connector with silicone dielectric grease before crimping.

The following steps at the six-pin and ten-pin connectors of the controller are to check if the ITS is defective. In both cases, move the key switch to the forward direction and press the accelerator just to the point of activating the solenoid.

 

At the six-pin connector

  1. Keep the positive probe of the multimeter above the red wire terminal of the six-pin connector. If there is no battery voltage, the red wire between the connector and the solenoid is faulty.
  2. Keep the positive probe of the multimeter above the black wire terminal of the six-pin connector. The voltage reading must be between 14 and 15 volts. If you don’t get this reading and the voltage is below 14 volts, the ITS may be defective. If it’s above 15 volts, the controller may be faulty.

 

At the ten-pin connector

  1. Keep the positive probe of the multimeter above the red wire terminal of the ten-pin connector. If there is no battery voltage, the red wire between the connector and the Run/Tow switch is faulty.
  2. Keep the positive probe of the multimeter above the black wire terminal of the ten-pin connector. The voltage reading must be between 14 and 16 volts. If you don’t get this reading and the voltage is below 14 volts, the ITS may be defective. If it’s above 16 volts, the controller is likely to have gone bad.

After doing the appropriate steps given above, the actions listed below can help you confirm if the inductive throttle sensor (ITS) in your EZGO golf cart is defective and needs a replacement.

  1. Remove the rocker panel insert that is present on the driver side.
  2. Pull the floor mat in the forward direction so that the metal cover of the pedal box is revealed.
  3. Take off the cover and also the four screws that hold the plastic cover of the pedal box in place.
  4. Similarly, remove the plastic cover.
  5. Take a digital multimeter and set it to the volts reading.
  6. Place the positive probe of the meter on the white wire terminal of the ITS.
  7. Release the accelerator pedal slowly. The reading should be in the 0.45V to 0.53V range when the micro-switch gets activated.
  8. Place the negative probe of the meter on the B- terminal of the battery.
  9. Turn the key to the ON position and release the accelerator pedal.
  10. Check the voltage reading on the multimeter. The reading should be 1V +/-0.3V when there is a clicking action of the solenoid. It must be 2.7V +/-0.5V when the pedal is fully pressed.

If the readings are not within the range specified above, it is an indication that the ITS is faulty and needs a replacement.

 

EZGO inductive throttle sensor troubleshooting

The inductive throttle sensor in an EZGO is a part of the electrical system of the golf cart and is connected through a wiring harness to the direction selector. It functions inside the pedal box. The ITS is used along with the cart’s electric speed controller like PDS, DCS and Series.

The following are some problems that could crop up with the sensor and their fixes.

  • Out of range voltage rating at the controller

If the voltage rating at the controller is 12 volts when measured as mentioned above, the ITS is defective. It would be best to go in for replacing the unit. On the other hand, if the rating is 14 volts, look out for a broken wire connection to the throttle and replace the wire.

  • Incorrect voltage reading at full throttle

If the voltage reading on the white wire at full throttle is less than 1.5 volts when the steps given earlier are performed, the ITS is malfunctioning and must be replaced. Ideally, the reading should show a smooth increase from 0.45 to 0.53 volts range to 1.5 to 2.6 volts range.

 

How to adjust EZGO inductive throttle sensor (ITS)

One major problem that you’re likely to face if the inductive throttle sensor isn’t adjusted properly is with respect to acceleration. When it goes bad or out of adjustment, it isn’t possible to adjust the speed of the cart. The ITS adjustment can be done by following the steps given here using a few basic tools.

  1. Loosen the Allen screw using a 5/64th Allen wrench.
  2. Loosen the 1/4-inch jam nut using a 7/16-inch open-end wrench. Remember to keep a hold on the slide end using a 9/16-inch open-end wrench.
  3. Repeat the above process a few times so that the 1/4-inch jam nut is backed off by many turns.
  4. Adjust the switch cam either outward or inward so that the clicking of the micro-switch takes place before the slide tube makes its entry into the ITS when the pedal is depressed. When the pedal is fully depressed, the end of the ITS and the slide tube must be flush against each other. It’s alright to have some protrusion.
  5. Tighten the above-mentioned loosened Allen screw and jam nut after the adjustments are done.
  6. Take the EZGO golf cart for a test drive and check if you can hear the solenoid clicking when the accelerator pedal is depressed.
  7. Check if the cart moves smoothly as you continue to depress the pedal.

You should be able to feel the full power when the pedal is depressed fully.

 

EZGO PDS ITS sensor location

The ITS of an EZGO PDS is housed under the floorboard. To access the ITS, you’ll have to take off the rocker panel from the driver’s side and lift the floor mat upwards. There is a cutout on the floorboard behind the accelerator pedal. You can raise the cutout and take off the screws that keep the lid in place on the pedal box.

Ernie

Ernie loves documenting interesting facts about golf.

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